GOT AN IDEA?

Check out our Facebook page for ideas on what could be done with the Rossdale power plant and site, and add your own.

10 Responses to “GOT AN IDEA?”

  1. Paul Vanderham July 3, 2013 at 10:39 PM #

    I’ve often thought that the power plant would make a very fine art gallery in the tradition the Musee d’Orsay in Paris, which is located in an old Beaux-Arts train station built circa 1898. To avoid duplication of the downtown gallery’s focus, the power plant could focus on showcasing emerging Alberta/Canadian artists.

  2. David Zip July 7, 2013 at 4:24 PM #

    I’m not sure of the dimensions but it should be possible to stack several ball hockey/ indoor soccer/ basket ball courts in the space. And maybe even an ice surface or 2. Groups of players are always willing to chip in for games to generate income for the facility especially with social media to help organize games and leagues. This type of gym space is also useful for conventions, trade shows, art show events. Especially if the funky industrial feel flows through the retrofit of the spaces i.e. steel girders, wood floors, industrial lighting, piping reused for HVAC.
    Plenty of inspiration from a basic Google image search.

  3. Lori T July 11, 2013 at 11:21 AM #

    What a great gem we have in our city, and what little vision our people have. I’m from Vancouver and how it became a great city was putting the cost of things aside, and looking at the big picture. Some people came from the “do nothing-spend nothing” there too and thank goodness nobody listened to them. It would be great to have something that could be used both in winter and summer. A gallery, something like a Granville Island even with a play place for kids. (something lacking downtown) They could have water taxies running in the summer and horse drawn in the winter. It could be anything but just not sitting there being a “do nothing”.

  4. Derek October 15, 2013 at 3:22 PM #

    You folks should consider putting on a placemaking event (on-site if permissions are possible) similar to this one in Halifax:

    http://placemakinghalifax.wordpress.com/

  5. Gerald November 16, 2013 at 3:51 PM #

    I have a great Idea. Why don’t you leave our Sacred Site ALONE!!! When will you people understand this is a Gravesite First and Foremost above all other ideas. Where does RESPECT fit in????

    Here is some questions I would like you to answer.

    When is it right to abuse a child?
    When is it right to abuse an elder?
    When is it right to abuse and Desecrate a known Sacred Site?
    When is it right to abuse and Desecrate a known Historical Burial Ground?

    There are two sides of History. Which side are you going to choose?
    When people try to convince themselves of something that is morally NOT right, to believe that it is right the
    humanity within that person is gone. Human Dignity should be also asked. With grand illusions such as this we personally don’t
    see it. $$

  6. Jonathan January 25, 2014 at 10:57 PM #

    However the site is to be used – gravesite, burial ground, hockey arena, art gallery, interpretive centre, market, etc – it will require significant investment. Also, the historical confluences of the site being home to the first Fort Edmonton, a Metis community, a place of trade between First Nations and Europeans, and an important industrial site require respect by the design. How can we honour all of these realities? Also, there are likely very practical considerations about flood vulnerability, erosion, archaeological protection, among others, that will take time and effort. Redevelopment principles could 1) respect the history (all of the histories) 2) build literacy about these histories 3) Make the past relevant to the present 4) Generate new social, ecological and economic value

    It wouldn’t be fair to speculate about the details until we have a shared understanding about the narrative for the site.

  7. jonathanveale January 25, 2014 at 10:57 PM #

    However the site is to be used – gravesite, burial ground, hockey arena, art gallery, interpretive centre, market, etc – it will require significant investment. Also, the historical confluences of the site being home to the first Fort Edmonton, a Metis community, a place of trade between First Nations and Europeans, and an important industrial site require respect by the design. How can we honour all of these realities? Also, there are likely very practical considerations about flood vulnerability, erosion, archaeological protection, among others, that will take time and effort. Redevelopment principles could 1) respect the history (all of the histories) 2) build literacy about these histories 3) Make the past relevant to the present 4) Generate new social, ecological and economic value

    It wouldn’t be fair to speculate about the details until we have a shared understanding about the narrative for the site.

  8. CranleighTowersResident April 23, 2015 at 10:56 PM #

    There are at least 50 high-rise buildings that have a direct view of the Rossdale power plant and we will be stuck forever with your eventual design.
    We are not even mentioned in your stakeholders consultation report.
    The building is beautiful, but I have to look at the DIRTY CHIMNEYS front and center every single day from my kitchen and living room and balcony.
    The average future visitor will swing by a few times a year and won’t have to put up with years of construction after years of construction on other projects. We also run and bike in that area as it is right now.
    BOTTOM LINE: You will piss off thousands of people if you keep the chimneys and forget about the bird’s eye view.

  9. CranleighTowersResident April 23, 2015 at 11:14 PM #

    You have to be able to rent a bike, snowshoes, etc.
    Running Room, tennis, beach volleyball. A hidden GIS indoor substation instead of what is there right now.
    Parking lots are EXTREMELY UGLY LOOKING (looking at the kinsmen parking lot just from the fourth floor is stressing me out)

    • RossdaleReGeneration April 24, 2015 at 5:41 PM #

      Thank you for the comment. You bring an interesting perspective on Rossdale’s future. Unfortunately, Rossdale Regeneration is not a coordinator of consultations and determining stakeholders, but there have been and will be more opportunities to discuss this with City of Edmonton and other stakeholders.

      Rossdale Power Plant is a provincially designated historic resource and the chimney stacks are part of that designation, so their removal is not forseeable. We hope you didn’t purchase your current residence with the understanding that there would be “improvements” to your sight lines and removal of parking lots and chimneys.

      While perhaps a minority view and concern, the presence of residential towers along the top of the river valley impedes sightlines and access into the river valley from adjacent neighbourhoods, not to mention blocking sunlight to some areas in the valley. The aesthetics of many of these buildings is not exactly universally appreciated either, but creative compromises typically prevail to balance the concerns of nearby residents with the eventual benefit to the many future visitors.

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